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Beer Review: Barley Brown's Turmoil CDA

Beer Review: Barley Brown's Turmoil CDA

An IPA that stands out in a hop-friendly Portland

In Portland, IPAs sell themselves. Over one in four beers we consume locally is a hop-tastic IPA, and in terms of sales growth, they’re speeding up over 30 percent. While we don’t have fancy sales stats for stouts, suffice it to say, people around here mostly shy away from them, possibly for fear they’re “too heavy.”

That bias doesn’t take into account the fact that a dry Irish stout is one of the lightest classic beer styles, or that boisterous Russian Imperial Stouts completely dominate user-generated best lists on RateBeer and BeerAdvocate. Where does that leave a style that is essentially a hybrid of the two? Black IPAs are recognized formally as American-style black ales by the Brewers Association, but are known locally and colloquially as Cascadian Dark Ales.

In this era of ever-hybridized India Pale Ales, only the dark version — in which recipes call for the hop additions of an IPA with the roasted malt bill of a stout or porter — has really taken off at the races. It’s safe to say Turmoil CDA from Eastern Oregon’s Barley Brown’s is the odds-on favorite.

Designed by former brewer Shawn Kelso and appreciably maintained by Marks Lanham, this workhorse marries bodacious hops and roasted malts with dual bitterness from citrus peel and unsweetened chocolate. It almost has the quality of a pesto, if it was made with pine nuts as well as cacao nibs.

This makes the beer a great partner for grilled meats and hard cheeses. And because Barley Brown’s recently expanded their brewery from a four-barrel pub system with the addition of a 20-barrel brewery across the street, look for Turmoil to appear on more taps, more frequently. It’s a beautiful 300 mile drive to Baker City! Or you can take a shortcut, and head over to Hawthorne Hophouse in SE PDX.

Brian Yaeger, Drink Portland


Back in the Black: IPA and CDA’s making a comeback in 2021

The never ending churn of India Pale Ale trends, styles, variants and hops occasionally sifts from the sands a vestige of times past, the latest mini resurgence is for Cascadian Dark Ale, aka Black IPA, aka American-style Black Ale. Experts dispute where the style originated, some claiming Phillips Brewing in Victoria, BC, others say Greg Noonan from his time at Vermont Pub and Brewery, and others still credit Rogue Ales famed brewmaster John Maier. It’s all about as fraught as the definition of craft beer, and can leave you wishing there was an Ancestry.com of beer.

Circa 2010 the dark brown to black ales that were hopped up like IPA’s began to gain popularity, and brewers began making the argument for it to become officially recognized by the trade organization Brewers Association. Two camps emerged, one advocating for a more northwest hop flavor and subdued roast, and the other a broader less regional definition that would allow for a wider variety of hop and bittered malt flavor. The former was pioneered by Portland beer writer Abram Goldman-Armstrong as being defined as a Cascadian Dark Ale, and the other was pushed heavily by California brewers to be called a Black IPA. The Brewers Association eventually decided to act as non-partisan body and recognized them by creating a catch all American-style India Black Ale category in 2010. That definition has since been revised into the current American-style Black Ale guidelines.

Fast forward a decade and the frontlines of the war between Black IPA, CDA and American-style Black Ale and we find much less interest in arguing the merits of each. Much like North and South Korea, the war was never called off but active conflict has subsided. Beer drinkers lost interest and turned to the latest trends that quickly followed and disappeared just as fast like White IPA, Belgian-style IPA and India Pale Lager (IPL). With the rise of hazy, juicy, smoothie and milkshake IPA’s, the debittered Black CDA’s of the early 2010’s dropped into the shadows but never really went away. Today, more than a decade since these beers officially made their debut onto the world stage, the Black IPA and CDA are again painting the town black.

Wookey Jack Black Rye IPA

Firestone Walker Brewing / Pasa Robles, CA

Wookey Jack black rye IPA emerged from the northern California forests for a brief appearance last fall at the Great American Beer Festival where it won a 2020 Gold Medal in the American-style Black Ale category. A limited amount was released into 16oz cans in the Propagator Series this January and were quickly hunted down by beer geeks. Firestone Walker initially had created it in 2012 as brewmaster Matt Brynildson’s answer to both the cries for even hoppier extreme ales, but Wookey Jack had ceased production in 2016.

“Wookey Jack was a reaction to a couple of things: first, there was a Black IPA “American Black Ale” trend going around the craft beer scene. In the Pacific North West they were calling these beers Cascadian Dark Ales. Essentially dark malts added to an bold IPA recipe,” says Brynildson. “At first I wasn’t a fan and saw it as an odd style, but our sales team was asking a lot about this style since they were seeing it out there in the world and it was getting a lot of attention. Secondly, we had recently released Union Jack and Double Jack. There were a few beer geeks out there saying that Firestone Walker still had yet to really make a truly over the top hoppy IPA – even after the release of Double Jack… so we decided to take the gloves off and make the biggest bold IPA we could at the time.”

The black rye IPA was a big hit with it’s one too punch of Citra and Amarillo hops, the two varieties that Brynildson says were “the most pungent and gnarly hops we had access to” at the time. The one two-punch of the hop combination with the added dimension of spicy rye bread flavors built into the grain bill makes Wookey Jack something unique. It went on to win Gold medals in it’s category two years in a row 2012-2013 at the Great American Beer Festival, and a bronze the next year at the World Beer Cup.

The name Wookey Jack refers to a term for hardcore fans of the jam band Phish, who Brynildson used to meet on tour. “Dread locked, blurry eyed tour wizards who smelled a bit dank, made their living on shake down street and never missed a show. It was a fun way to describe a beer that was a reaction to folks saying we didn’t make a dank and gnarly enough IPA.”

The recent January can release of Wookey Jack (the first time in 16oz packaging and with a new label design) was an instant sell-out and may already be difficult to find. Based on it’s successful return, it will be interesting to see if the Black IPA has the legs to return to touring in the near future.

In Oregon the La Résistance is still strong, and many breweries have kept Cascadian Dark Ales on the menu despite the handful who have adopted Black IPA naming conventions.

Bad Santa CDA

Pelican Brewing / Pacific City, OR

Pelican Brewing has never let their devotion to pacific northwest flavor die, they have been brewing Bad Santa CDA as a winter seasonal every year since 2007. While other winter warmer type ales have come and go, Pelican has stayed true to delivering a big black bag of hops every year for those craving a little roast with their hops, or vice-versa.

“Black IPA is an oxymoron, honestly. American Black Ale is possibly the most boring and unhelpful style descriptor ever. Cascadian Dark Ale communicates with NW customers in a way that the other two style descriptors do not,” says Pelican’s longtime brewmaster Darron Welch who helped develop Bad Santa with former brewer Jason Schoneman.

Welch says he doesn’t remember where he first heard the term CDA, but credits Oregon’s Barley Browns Brew Pub with brewing the first great rendition of it that he had tried. Barley Browns Turmoil CDA was part of the inspiration to brew Pelican’s own take on the emerging style a few years later.

“Of all the CDAs I’ve ever tasted, it is by far the one that most successfully balances soft roast character with citrusy and piney hops. Most of the time, these sharper hop characters clash with roasted malt flavors, at least for me. Turmoil is pretty unique in that it creates a harmonious balanced flavor with citrusy hops and roasted malts.”

The initial recipe for Bad Santa was built around herbal and woody character of Ahtanum hops and how well they meshed with soft roasted malts. However the beer was arguably improved in 2010 when Pelican was forced to replace Ahtanum with English heritage Fuggle hops because of the formers lack of becoming a widely cultivated variety. Darron believes the Fuggles mesh even better than Ahtanum did with the recipes use of pale, melanoidin and dehusked black malts.

At Pelican, they are all about the harmonious balance of flavors, perhaps more so in the CDA where hops can struggle against roasted barley. “Too many examples of this style have caramel malts or citrusy hops that clash on the pallet and give an overall confused and muddled impression,” opines Pelican CEO Jim Prinzing. “Too much residual extract makes this style especially cloying and chewy. That beer [Bad Santa] is very indicative of Darron’s brewing philosophy—every ingredient in that beer is there for a reason and there’s nothing extra that muddles the flavors.”

Welch believes the keys to a great CDA are:

Soft rounded roastiness that is noticeable but not dominating. This isn’t just a hoppy stout or porter.

Earthy, herbal, and citrusy hops. Woody, more floral hops balance better with roast malt. A dry-hop of citrusy hops like Cascade lends some brightness and a more assertive flavor and aroma.

Drier, more well-attenuated finish to establish it as part of the IPA family. Residual sugars and extracts would detract from its drinkability.

Bad Santa returns every winter in 12oz bottles and 6-packs.

Sublimely Self-Righteous Black IPA

Stone Brewing / Escondido, CA

Firmly in the Black IPA camp, Stone co-founder Greg Koch was an extremely vocal proponent of naming convention in the early 2010’s. In January, Stone revived their Sublimely Self Righteous Black IPA calling it their most requested beer ever.

“We get 'BRING BACK SSR' comments on just about everything we post to socials,” noted Pope. “Pictures of Stone IPA, videos of our bottling line, a clip of a kitten playing in a Stone Buenaveza box. there's always a 'BRING BACK SSR' somewhere in the comment section. Well, we heard you. It’s awesome to finally reply back with an enthusiastic ‘OK!’"

For a brewery known for extreme ales, Sublimely Self-Righteous fit right in at the time it was introduced. While many beers attempted more balance, Sublimely wallops you with a huge bitter blackened hop flavor and bitterness over top of the style signature smooth malty character.

Sublimely pours black, darker and stronger than most of its counterparts at 8.7% ABV. It has the chocolate and coffee notes of a stout that make it come off closer to a Russian Imperial Stout that was hopped like a Double IPA. Part of it’s signature flavor, is the intense piney and orange-raspberry hop flavor with cold coffee and black currant in the aroma.

For those craving 12 ounces of nostalgia and those simply seeking the remarkable, Stone Sublimely Self-Righteous Black IPA is now available nationwide in 12oz six-pack glass and 22oz bottles for a limited time. Use Stone's Beer Finder to locate the beer near you.

Citra Solstice Black IPA

Coldfire Brewing / Eugene, OR

When they first began making Citra Solstice, Eugene, Oregon’s Coldfire Brewing had called it a CDA but over time began to call it a Black IPA to avoid consumer confusion. Brewer/co-owner Stephen Hughes acknowledges the Cascade region’s part in the history of the style, but feels that no area can call it their own as it was likely being simultaneously developed all over the country. That said, Citra Solstice was created because of a request by bar manager Drake McKee to make a CDA.

When creating Citra Solstice, the recipe was based around the house yeast strain which tends to throw off some fruity flavors. Hughes was afraid the esters would clash with ashy flavors of dark malt, so he built the grain bill and hop selections around chocolate-orange candy, for that there would need to be a little more body and sweetness. They went for a soft base malt bill with Rahr Pale and Golden Promise, but layered in a lot of complexity for darkness and body with Weyermann chocolate wheat, Carafa special II, and a little bit of both low and medium SRM crystal malts and golden naked oats. To get the color deep without overly roasty, they use Sinamar in the whirlpool.

As the name suggests, Citra Solstice if full of Citra hops. Whereas the CDA’s of the mid 2010’s would be packed full of cascade, chinook, maybe even galena, summit or magnum hops, this rendition is a very modern interpretation. With the goal in mind of nodding to the piny resinous character of older Black IPA’s, Hughes added the orangey but also piney and resinous variety Simcoe in both CO2 extract and T90 pellet form. They finish off with a punch of “C” hops including lots of Citra in the dry-hop.

“There is a super cool and unexpected harmony that can occur when the right balance is struck that makes this style a challenge and a great reward,” says Hughes, who seems to have slight regrets in calling Citra Solstice a Black IPA. “After I read your email, I went to the bar and asked a beertender for a CDA. They instantly knew exactly what I meant and handed me a frothy pint of Citra Solstice. That makes me happy.”

PFriem CDA

pFriem Family Brewers / Hood River, OR

Cascadian Dark Ale was in the lineup in pFriem’s first year back in 2012 and it’s made atleast an annual appearance every year since. Though brewmaster/co-owner Josh Pfriem acknowledges that the style is not in demand as it once was, it’s achieved a solid following as a winter seasonal and really hit a sweet spot in recent years. It’s also a fitting tribute to their home, foot planted firmly into Cascadia.

“I remember around that time brewers were in the early stages of taking new spins on IPA. There were a couple of folks in particular that were really excited about making a CDA more than a one off, in particular I remember Abram Goldman-Armstrong and Jim Parker really speaking to this dark hoppy beer being a thing from the Pacific Northwest or Cascadia if you will,” says Pfriem.

His first experience was the Secession CDA from Hopworks Urban Brewery in Portland. It had a touch of roast, but certainly wasn’t a stout. Despite all the pushback on CDA, pFriem has stuck with the nomenclature and the beer. For Josh it’s the perfect beer for winter in Cascadia.

“I vividly remember our first batch of CDA at pFriem, it was like drinking a liquid Douglas Fir.”

Ace of Diamonds Imperial Black IPA

Hopworks Urban Brewery / Portland, OR

Hopworks Urban Brewery was also an early adopter of Cascadian Dark Ales, owing much of that to their close ties to homebrewer, writer and CDA pusher Abram Goldman-Armstrong. Back in 2011 Hopworks released Secession CDA based on Goldman’s homebrew recipe, and it epitomized everything that made the style unique. Lush piney and pungently grapefruit like hops, earthy dankness, with an underlying and deceivingly light subtly roasty edge. If you closed your eyes, you almost couldn’t tell that Secession was black.

Ace of Diamonds Imperial Black IPA is a new take on the style that Hopworks is currently pouring on draft and packaging in 16oz cans. Unrelated to Goldman-Armstrong’s Secession recipe, Ace of Diamonds is especially current with it’s reliance on cryo hopping and a blend of modern hops Centennial, Simcoe, Mosaic, Cascade. While Goldman-Armstrong may take umbrage with it being called a Black IPA, Hopworks has nodded to the CDA with the green, white and blue colors on the label art that emulate the flag of Cascadia.

Ruse Brewing’s Dark Between the Stars

Also Available Now:

Culmination Brewing: 4 & 20 Black IPA

The annual winter release of Four & Twenty Imperial Black IPA was in late December and it was the first beer Culmination ever made. Strong Porter notes of roast and chocolate working with a heavy NW Hop profile of Chinook, Amarillo, Cascade, and Centennial for notes of spice and pine.

Ruse Brewing: Dark Between the Stars

Released on January 21st, Ruse’s take on American-style Black Ale was brewed with midnight wheat, munich malt, and flaked oats for the appropriate light but full bodied flavor. The hops are all fruity with a bit of funk thrown in as the recipe is loaded down with Citra, Mosaic and Amarillo. 8% ABV and available now in 16oz cans.

Threshold Brewing & Blending: Cascadia Rising

With a light roastiness and clean dark malt character, dry-hopped with Centennial, Columbus and Idaho 7. 7.3% abv. On draft now at Threshold and available to-go in 16oz crowlers.

Baerlic Brewing: Dark Thoughts

A seasonally produced classical IPA based CDA that is brewed with cold-steeped roasted malts for an eerily smooth darkness. Dry-hopped with .666 lbs per barrel of Columbus & Mosaic hops. Inquire with the brewery about when the next release will be, new batches typically drop in the first first quarter of the year.


Big news for Barley Brown’s

Ever since the story broke that Barley Brown’s Brewpub Brewer Shawn Kelso was leaving the Baker City brewery to join 10 Barrel Brewing (as the head of their announced Boise brewpub), the Brewpub itself has been somewhat overshadowed by the ensuing news. But after spending the final weekend of spring break in Baker City, visiting friends and talking beer with a number of folks, I’m happy to report that Barley Brown’s is weathering the “storm” just fine and even has big changes of their own in the works—including a new brewer and a big expansion.

And one thing I can’t iterate enough: if you haven’t been out to Baker City and visited Barley Brown’s in person, then you need to find time to make the trip! Yes, they’re located on the far eastern end of Oregon but it’s worth the trek: both for the Brewpub and for the historic, picturesque town of Baker City (population about 10,000). Plan to go soon.

The Basics

We had visited Baker City once before, back in 2009, and I first wrote a review of Barley Brown’s then: first about the beer, then the overall review. From a review standpoint there’s little I can add—service is good, food is excellent (I had the Shrimp and Alligator Mad Pasta again), the beers are great. It has a casual, friendly ambiance and is authentically a working brewery, from the view of the brewing operations behind glass:

To grain bags stacked in the back:

To the many awards and medals on the wall:

The beer this time came 10 to a sampler tray—all 10 taps—and here’s what was pouring:

  • Coyote Peak Wheat
  • New IPA probably named “Hoodlum”
  • Aged SledWreck
  • Espresso Stout
  • Disorder Stout
  • SpeedWobble IRA
  • TankSlapper Double IPA
  • Cerveza Negra Caliente
  • Two Smoke
  • Hassle Brown

A picture, in clockwise order following this list starting with the lemon-wedge-included Coyote Peak Wheat at the top:

Many of these I’d reviewed before, but I do have a few notes about these (of course). The new “Hoodlum” IPA is one of the first beers brewed entirely by the new brewer, Marks Lanham, as is the Hassle Brown (in other words, not following already-existing BB’s recipes). Both are fresh, drinkable beers, the IPA is lightly bodied and bright and floral, the Brown is competently brewed but frankly, it’s a brown ale—not always the most exciting of styles. (This is not a criticism of the brewer either.)

The Aged SledWreck is fantastic: a 2010 vintage of their hoppy strong winter seasonal, it has lovely oxidation notes that give it a sherry character and it’s rich and sippable.

The SpeedWobble and TankSlapper were a couple of the last beers brewed by Kelso I believe, and both are chewy, delicious, and face-smackingly hoppy—the kinds of big bold beers that draw crowds of beer geeks whenever they show up outside of Baker City.

The Cerveza Negra Caliente is a dark or “black” version of their summertime Hot Blonde: a light, crisp ale infused with jalapeno peppers. This version has just the right amount of chili heat to it. And the Two Smoke is their Whiskey Malt Ale, a deliciously chewy smoked beer—it’s the same beer (which I called “the gem of the bunch” three years ago), only the name had to change (for some sort of OLCC-related reason I think, having “whiskey” in the name).

As for the brewery itself, owner Tyler Brown was kind enough to give us a full tour, starting with their new keg washing system (which will clean something like 40 kegs per hour, versus their older method which took seven hours to clean 25 kegs—and this will be crucial in their expansion plans outlined below) and continuing into the 4 barrel brewhouse situated in a tight space just off the kitchen. Three fermenters and a bright tank are behind the glass in the viewable working space (in the picture above), and these are kept full all the time, continually rotating to keep up with demand.

The walls of the inside brewing space are famously plastered with strips of blue tape representing every batch of beer brewed since the Brewpub started: when a batch would hit the tank(s), the tape would go on the tank with the name, original gravity, and date brewed. It’s a little haphazard but a charming detail to the Barley Brown’s story and fascinating from an historical perspective. For instance, this:

That there is the first-ever batch of what would become Barley’s signature Turmoil Cascadian Dark Ale, brewed in 2004 with an original gravity of 1.070.

The other detail to the brewing operations that I really liked is the fact that they mill all their grain with a portable grain mill that they wheel out to the sidewalk behind the Brewpub to operate Brown was relaying the story of hauling the mill out in 10-degree weather with the new brewer and joked, “You know how they market ‘Frost Brewed Beer’? I said we brew ‘Frost Milled Beer’!” That should be on a T-shirt!

The New Brewer(s)

The new brewer is Marks Lanham, who previously did a stint brewing at Bend’s Boneyard Beer, and before that, was with Grand Teton Brewing in Idaho. (Ironically, I’ve got a press release from 2011 about Grand Teton that mentions Lanham.)

Lanham likes hoppy beers, which makes brewing for Barley Brown’s a perfect fit, but is by no means limited to big hops: In addition to brewing the Hoodlum IPA and Hassle Brown, he also has a fermenter full of an Irish Red that he wanted to brew as a spring beer, in part for St. Patrick’s Day.

Talking (and drinking) with Lanham several times over the weekend, it’s apparent that he is a knowledgeable, passionate brewer with an appropriate level of “brewer’s arrogance”—he isn’t shy with his opinions which earned him some good-natured ribbing—but he knows his beer and he’s definitely in the right place to exercise that passion.

The other brewer we met was Eli Dickison, a Baker City native and former employee of Barley Brown’s who is currently attending Oregon State University in their Fermentation Science program. He was back in town for spring break and helping out in the brewery, and will be coming back on full time in June after he graduates from OSU. He’s bright and enthusiastic and will definitely be a brewer to keep an eye on.

The Expansion

Right now, Barley Brown’s is a non-bottling brewpub with a 4bbl capacity, and nearly every drop of beer they brew is only served in Baker City when the occasional keg does make it over the mountains to Portland (or on rarer occasion, Bend), it’s because either owner Tyler Brown or the brewers have driven it over in person. Which is why, despite all of the awards and buzz that Barley Brown’s has been garnering these past few years, very few people outside of Baker have actually had their beer.

Last year they bought the building next door (and just across the street), a 6400-square foot space that was originally built in 1940 as a Safeway grocery store and was subsequently an auto parts store. It has its own parking lot (which Barley Brown’s customers have already been using, as the Brewpub itself does not have off-street parking) and that combined with the option to close the (side) street shared between the buildings, gives the Brewpub a great venue option to be able to host outdoor events.

The building itself has high open-beamed ceilings and solid concrete flooring which makes it perfect for their needs. Since the first of the year they’ve been clearing the space and drawing up plans for their expansion into the building: a 20bbl JV Northwest brewhouse with ample cold storage, room for additional fermentation tanks as they grow, and a nice open tasting room that will have a great view of both downtown Baker City and the open brewing area.

This expansion will serve as a production brewery that will produce kegs of beer to meet their growing demand and which will finally allow them to distribute outside of Baker City. I believe there will be bottling equipment as well, though likely small-scale at first (or perhaps a phase two development). They will be brewing all of their “house” beers in the new brewery, while still retaining the 4bbl system over in the pub, which will be used for smaller-batch and special brews and recipe development.

They will likely self-distribute at first, before exploring various distributor options. This also means it will still stay fairly local initially, which means within Oregon. (And even then I wouldn’t expect to see their beer everywhere in Oregon—the Coast, for example, which is as much a matter of self-distribution logistics as anything.)

The distribution angle is huge I don’t think the demand for Barley Brown’s beer outside of Eastern Oregon can be understated and Brown is very aware of this demand and growth potential—while at the same time, he’s very focused on staying “local” and putting Baker City first (and rightly so). But with kegs of their beer more widely available and the overall expansion underway, I could easily see how this could all work to make Barley Brown’s much more of a “destination” brewery and start drawing a lot more people to them.

(Incidentally, Baker City is around 5 hours by freeway from Portland, about 4.25 hours from Bend, and around or just under 2 hours by freeway from Boise.)

There is still a lot of work to do in the new space and the JV Northwest brewhouse is currently being built, and even given how construction projects of this nature can go, Brown is cautiously optimistic that they could be up and running sometime between June and mid-July. Then of course with ramping up production and beginning to distribute kegs, I can imagine seeing Barley Brown’s beers outside of Baker City as early as the end of the year—though this is entirely my own speculation (or wishful thinking).

Big things are happening, and I’ll reiterate what I said at the beginning of this post: make the trip to Baker City. Particularly sometime soon as the weather warms up do yourself a favor and visit Barley Brown’s in person. It’s worth the drive.


How To Brew American Lager Beer | Homebrew Challenge

American Lager as a beer style has gained a truly undeserved reputation. In the mid-1800s, American’s enjoyment of beer centered around higher abv, dark beers, much like parts of Europe.

Americans did not have many options because barley did not fare well as a crop in the colonies and importing from Europe would be too costly.

Importing English beers was also cost prohibitive. Americans were left ingredients that they could readily find around them such as corn, wheat, squash – including pumpkins, molasses, and peas.

Hi. We were at the mod in Pittsburgh and I’m here with Thomas Vincent Thomas. Welcome. Thank you. Thanks so much for doing this now. Um, now Thomas is a head-brewer and uh, also is a educator. He has, uh, taught a class at wake tech for a number of years on brewing.

And in fact, I’m a graduate of his class, and he survived. I survived. It was a great toss. We got to go to breweries all over the place. We’ve brewed our own beer. Underground. ESP was our beer. Great.

So I wanted to ask you about this beer style, which is just American lager. What you think is sort of the main characteristics of that sort of, there’s a “whole lot of nothing”, and, and it’s very balanced about that, that they intentionally stays away from any strong character strong flavor, but the interesting thing is about it.

But when you think about it, the light lager, which is the Coors light, the Bud light, whatever you have those when you have those, the efforvessence overwhelms the other characteristics of the beer, but with this in comparison to you do actually oftentimes get the hop character coming out, or you get a little more graininess to it than you necessarily would out of that light lager in comparison. So there is flavor going on, but it’s very subtle.

So for the commercial example, I got Tough Folks from true fever and company. That’s a little local brewing company, so I’m going to try sure.

I do get a little bit of, uh, corn kind of in the finished in the note of that. I’m not really getting much hop character myself. I can definitely smell the corn. I think that’s an independent part of style.

It’s definitely would not consider too much of an off flavors like an IPA or something. I think that accomplishes the goal, meets the style. Yes, it meets the style. It’s not really hoppy in any sort of bitterness in any element. And there is just that little bit of sweetness in there, Thomas. Thank you. Cheers.

For each one of these brews, I always consult my trustee BJCP guidelines and get to learn a little bit about the beer styles. And it describes here how the American lager is heavily influenced from German immigrants and pilsner lager, and also how it sort of morphed into what it is today through the prohibition.

But it also sort of describes the beer in a little bit of a snooty way. Let, let me read this to you. It says it “became the dominant beer style for many decades, spawning many international rivals who would develop similarly bland products for mass market supported by heavy advetising.”

I’m going to see if we can brew an American lager that really isn’t bland, but actually it’s just a little bit of pleasant, sweetness and corny characteristics to it. This beer, I’m mashing it at 152 Fahrenheit. I tried to get to pre boil gravity of 1.034 . Hops for this one, just bittering hops, actually 1.5 ounces of Halertauer Pellets, and that’s to get to an IBU of about 16.

Let’s talk yeast because that’s where the little twist is. Now, traditionally, and this sort of beer, you would use something like white labs, WLP840 which I have harvested a little bit of that from my last brew was American light lager.

However, I’m not going to use that. I’m going to use WLP001. That is California ale yeast. Yes that’s all right. Ale yeast. Now, before anybody freaks out, let me explain firstly, technically the BJCP style guidelines, don’t actually say you have to use a lager yeast, even though it’s called a lager. Now I take the point, it does say lager in the title, but there you go.

Secondly, I’ve read in a lot of places that actually to get that clean and crisp taste that you want out of this beer, it is actually sometimes preferable to use a very clean finishing WLP001.

So I’ve made a starter, hold on. Here’s my starter. So this is the WLP001. I’m going to pitch this and ferment initially at 68 Fahrenheit. Then when fermentation is kind of nearly done, I’ll Bump it up to 72. Alright.

I’m here with my dad to try American lager. Now dad I know this is not your favorite beer style, but I’ve had my fair share tasteless assuie beer. So I can probably give this a, you know, a reasonable review.

All right. We’ll see if we can beat tasteless assuie beers. There’s the first of all color, um, pretty light straw color, right?

Yelloe, which is not really when I think of this beer, but it’s not a good start.

Very yellow. That’s not good. It’s not dark enough. Okay. All right. And then aroma. What do you think about aroma?

Reasonably nice, but not aroma I don’t think.

About 4.5% in alcohol. Um, so let’s try the taste.

More flavor than those other Aussie beers. And I think that’s a nice, refreshing drink on a hot day. We’ve just come back from a walk and the hot and humid evening. And that’s a nice refreshing drink at the end of the day. I wouldn’t want too many, one would be enough, but one is very nice.

It’s yeah. Um, so this is very much towards the Budweiser. It’s kind of known as a lawn mower beer. The idea being that you cut the grass and then come in and your thirsty, And yeah, I could see that. And that would go down in one or two sips to get that down. I think after mowing, especially mowing your lawn.


Beer Review: Barley Brown's Turmoil CDA - Recipes

San_Diego_Matt wrote: what sort of time frame are we talking about for these beers?

rogue's beer, Barley Brown's turmoil, and Walking Man's Big black homo

3 years ago? 5 years ago? 10 years ago?

Ive been here 7 years and big black homo is the only one I've really seen around before about 6 months ago. Barley brown's turmoil (allegedly the beer stone based sublimely self righteous off of) has probably been around a while but is just now showing up here in portland because it has a media buzz to it.
I'm just sayin beer regionalism is so dumb, and all these oregon breweries are jumping on this right now because of media exposure.

Re: Brewing TV - 10 - Cascadian Dark Ale Debate

Ive been here 7 years and big black homo is the only one I've really seen around before about 6 months ago. [/quote]


after reading that I feel like I need to say that all of Walking Man's beer's have walking/human evolving type names i.e. pale strider wheat, bi ped red, homo erectus ipa and the black version big black homo. and let's not forget the barrel aged one. my old Kentucky homo

Re: Brewing TV - 10 - Cascadian Dark Ale Debate

I actually quite like that one.

This is a style I've actually not been too impressed with as far as commercial examples go. I find them all to be basically porters with just a touch more hops than a typical example (I've actually quite liked some of the beers, but haven't found them to be particularly distinct as a new style).

I've brewed several myself, and have nailed what I feel is my own personal vision of the style
http://www.brewmate.net/recipes/jj9Co0j . PTFNzO.xml

Re: Brewing TV - 10 - Cascadian Dark Ale Debate

I second the black bitter.

Also, I don't see the CDA style as being created in the area. As a homebrewer, in the past when I started toying with my own recipes instead of brewing kits or clones, I made hoppy (IPA-like) beers with roasted/chocolate malts to get flavor and color. I didn't live in Cascadia (where-ever that is). I am sure many scores of homebrewers out there have done the same thing, whether that is making hoppy "india - brown - ales" or whatever.


Barley Brown's Beer

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Northwest-Style IPA. Citrus, tropical, and pine hops meet a balanced malt background. Multi time Great American Beer Festival medal winner. #BrilliantlyBitterIPA… Read More

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International Style Pale Ale. Medium-light body, with a unique hop profile coming from the mix of Simcoe, Mosaic, Galaxy and other unnamed hops.

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2015 GABF Gold Medal Winner. A bright IPA brewed with Mellon, Mosaic and Simcoe Hops. Light bitterness and balanced with fruity hop aroma.

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IPA - Black / Cascadian Dark Ale

Opaque, bold, and loaded with hops. 7.8% ABV 2016 & 2014 World Beer Cup Gold Medal Winner. 3 Time GABF Medal Winner.

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Beer Review: Barley Brown's Turmoil CDA - Recipes

Re: Barley Brown - Black IPA

Re: Barley Brown - Black IPA

Turmoil is also in the July issue of Zymurgy

Re: Barley Brown - Black IPA

Turmoil Cascadian Dark Ale clone
(5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)
OG = 1.070 FG = 1.010
IBU = 94 SRM = 35 ABV = 7.9%

Ingredients
11.5 lbs. (5.2 kg) 2-row pale malt
18 oz. (0.51 kg) Weyermann Carafa® II malt (450 °L)
18 oz. (0.51 kg) Munich malt
8.0 oz. (0.23 kg) crystal malt (40 °L)
12 oz. (0.34 kg) wheat malt
3.0 AAU Columbus hops (first wort hops) (0.2 oz./5.7 g of 15% alpha acid)
1.3 AAU Simcoe hops (first wort hops) (0.1 oz./2.8 g of 12.8% alpha acid)
7.0 AAU Magnum hops (60 mins) (0.5 oz /14 g of 14% alpha acid)
6.4 AAU Simcoe hops (60 mins) (0.5 oz /14 g of 12.8% alpha acid)
4.0 AAU Amarillo hops (30 mins) (0.4 oz /11 g of 10% alpha acid)
2.6 AAU Cascade hops (15 mins) (0.5 oz /14 g of 5.25% alpha acid)
2.6 AAU Cascade hops (2 mins) (0.5 oz /14 g of 5.25% alpha acid)
3.9 AAU Cascade hops (0 mins) (0.75 oz /21 g of 5.25% alpha acid)
1.25 oz. (35 g) Amarillo hops (dry hops)
½ tsp. yeast nutrient (15 mins)
½ tsp. Irish moss (30 mins)
White Labs WLP001 (California Ale), Wyeast 1056 (American Ale) or Fermentis US-05 yeast
0.75 cup (150 g) corn sugar (for priming)

Step by Step
This is a single step infusion mash using 11.5 lbs. (5.2 kg) 2-row pale malt to replace the liquid and dry malt extract. Mix the crushed grains with 19 quarts (18 L) of 163 °F (73 °C) water to stabilize at 152° F (67 °C) for 60 minutes. Sparge slowly with 170 °F (77 °C) water. Collect approximately 7.0 gallons (26 L) of wort runoff to boil for 90 minutes. Add first wort hops (FWH) as you are collecting your wort. Reduce the 60-minute Magnum hop addition to 0.5 oz. (14 g) (7.0 AAU) and the 30 minute Amarillo hop addition to 0.4 oz. (11 g) (4.0 AAU) to allow for the higher utilization factor of a full wort boil. The remainder of this recipe is the same as the extract with grains recipe.


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Black IPA / Cascadian Dark Ale - Extract Brew?

I've read, and searched. While I've seen a few recipes here and there for a Black IPA / Cascadian Dark Ale - most of what I've found has just been bickering about the name difference.

Can anyone point me in the right direction (or post up some) for recipes that would produce something similar to Southern Tiers Iniquity?

Also, if anyone knows of any great extract recipes for a "Hop Rod Rye" clone, I'd be eternally greatfull. Looking to brew a couple things up this weekend and those are my choices.

Jcaligure

New Member

HoppingRazor

Member

I just purchased a "Black IPA" extract kit from Nothern Brewer, their site lists the recipe for the kit. I will give a review on this kit soon as I am going to brew it this weekend. I have not seen "Southern Tiers Iniquity" In MD od DC so Im notsure if this recipe is simillar to that brew..Hope this helps.

Naked_Eskimo

Well-Known Member

Hannylicious

Member

Is that the recipe you were speaking of?
I think I might give that a try this weekend! Looks good to me.

Hopping - let me know how that kit turns out, I particularly enjoy this style of beer, so I'm sure I'll want to be trying other variations!

Jcaligure

New Member

The story is followed by a few recipes, including the one you mentioned.

Well-Known Member

Hop Rod Rye clones available from BYO classic recipes. Google it.

Denny's RYE IPA is better IMO. Also posted all over the place.

Finny13

Well-Known Member

Cruckin78

Well-Known Member

Kyles609

Well-Known Member

I've been looking to brew a Black IPA and that link is very helpful. Just one question why are my IBU's so far off when I plug this into Beersmith. I plugged the hop additions in identical and the AA% are the same. I have both batches set to 5 Gallons, any more and the IBU'a go down of course. I'm sure I'm missing something.

Turmoil Cascadian Dark Ale clone

W-10 Pitch Black IPA clone

Koduolu

HBT Lurker

HoppingRazor

Member

EKennett

Well-Known Member

Eanmcnulty

Well-Known Member

I've read, and searched. While I've seen a few recipes here and there for a Black IPA / Cascadian Dark Ale - most of what I've found has just been bickering about the name difference.

Can anyone point me in the right direction (or post up some) for recipes that would produce something similar to Southern Tiers Iniquity?

Also, if anyone knows of any great extract recipes for a "Hop Rod Rye" clone, I'd be eternally greatfull. Looking to brew a couple things up this weekend and those are my choices.

FlipMasterFlash

Well-Known Member

Alexdagrate

Well-Known Member

Impressive! Deschutes HitD is one of the best examples of the style.

I've made numerous batches of CDAs, mostly with pale malt extract and de-husked german dark malts.

I made my last batch using Deschutes' preferred technique of using normal black malts (roasted barley & black patent), but cold-steeping instead of boiling. I cold-steeped a half pound of roasted barley and a half pound of black patent overnight in the fridge, strained it and dump the cold wert into the last 10 min of the boil.

Turned out fantastic. Dehusked german malts are harder to find (at least for me), so cold steeping is a convenient and cheap way to make CDAs without those fancy grains.

FYI, I still got just the right amount of roasty flavor while avoiding unpleasant astringency.


Watch the video: The weirdest beer Ive ever brewed (January 2022).